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Programming language: C++
License: MIT License
Tags: Logging     iOS     Windows     Linux     Library     C++14     C++17     Low Latency    
Latest version: v2.4.2

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README

Quill

Asynchronous Low Latency C++ Logging Library

homebrew vcpkg conan
brew install quill vcpkg install quill quill/[>=1.2.3]

Introduction

Quill is a cross-platform low latency logging library based on C++14/C++17.

There are two versions on the library:

v2 : C++17 v1.7 : C++14

Going forward any new features will only be added to the C++17 version of the library. The old library (v1.7.x) still remains there and there will be releases only for bug fixes.

The main goals of the library are:

  • Simplicity A small example code snippet should be enough to get started and use most of the features.
  • Performance Ultra low latency. No formatting on the hot-path, asynchronous only mode. No hot-path allocations for fundamental types, enums and strings (including std::string and std::string_view). Any other custom or user defined type gets copy constructed with the formatting done on a backend worker thread.
  • Convenience Ease application monitoring/debugging. Latency is equal to latencies of binary loggers, but the produced log is in human-readable form.

Features

  • Log anything - Blazing fast. See Benchmarks.
  • Format outside the hot-path in a backend logging thread. For non-built-in types ostream::operator<<() is called on a copy of the object by the backend logging thread. Unsafe to copy non-trivial user defined are detected in compile time. Those types can be tagged as safe-to-copy to avoid formatting them on the hot path. See User Defined Types.
  • Custom formatters. Logs can be formatted based on a user specified pattern. See Formatters.
    • Support for log stack traces. Store log messages in a ring buffer and display later on a higher severity log statement or on demand. See Backtrace Logging.
    • Various logging targets. See Handlers.
    • Console logging with colours support.
    • File Logging
    • Rotating log files
    • Time rotating log files
    • JSON logging
    • Custom Handlers
    • Filters for filtering log messages. See Filters.
  • Ability to produce structured log. See Structured-Log
  • guaranteed non-blocking or non-guaranteed logging. In non-guaranteed mode there is no heap allocation of a new queue but log messages can be dropped. See FAQ.
  • Support for wide character logging and wide character filenames (Windows and v1.7.x only).
  • Log statements in timestamp order even when produced by different threads. This makes debugging multithreading applications easier.
    • Log levels can be completely stripped out at compile time reducing if branches.
    • Clean warning-free codebase even on high warning levels.
    • Crash safe behaviour with a build-in signal handler.
    • Type safe python style API with compile type checks and built-in support for logging STL types/containers by using the excellent {fmt} library.

Performance

:fire: ** Updated November 2022 ** :fire:

Log Numbers

The following message is logged 100'000 times per thread LOG_INFO(logger, "Logging int: {}, int: {}, double: {}", i, j, d).

The results in the tables below are in nanoseconds (ns).

1 Thread

Library 50th 75th 90th 95th 99th 99.9th Worst
Quill v2,3.2 Unbounded Queue 18 20 21 22 25 29 53
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Unbounded Queue 16 18 20 22 26 32 55
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Disabled, Unbounded Queue 15 17 19 21 26 36 51
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Bounded Queue 16 17 19 20 25 29 47
fmtlog 17 19 21 22 25 34 62
PlatformLab NanoLog 53 66 75 80 92 106 199
MS BinLog 41 43 44 46 66 118 236
Reckless 62 75 79 84 94 103 158
Iyengar NanoLog 164 186 213 232 305 389 24257
spdlog 694 761 838 887 996 1143 1762
g3log 5398 5639 5875 6025 6327 6691 7545

4 Threads

Library 50th 75th 90th 95th 99th 99.9th Worst
Quill v2.3.2, Unbounded Queue 17 19 21 22 24 28 51
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Unbounded Queue 16 19 22 24 32 45 59
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Disabled, Unbounded Queue 15 18 21 23 30 40 57
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Bounded Queue 16 18 21 23 29 42 61
fmtlog 15 18 21 22 25 32 68
PlatformLab NanoLog 56 67 77 82 95 159 340
MS BinLog 42 44 46 48 76 118 214
Reckless 46 62 78 92 113 155 229
Iyengar NanoLog 150 168 247 289 355 456 25126
spdlog 728 828 907 959 1140 1424 2060
g3log 5103 5318 5525 5657 5927 6279 7290

Log Numbers and Large Strings

The following message is logged 100'000 times per thread LOG_INFO(logger, "Logging int: {}, int: {}, string: {}", i, j, large_string). The large string is over 35 characters to avoid short string optimisation of std::string

1 Thread

Library 50th 75th 90th 95th 99th 99.9th Worst
Quill v2,3.2 Unbounded Queue 29 30 31 32 35 42 66
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Unbounded Queue 26 28 29 31 35 45 68
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Disabled, Unbounded Queue 122 136 148 156 170 187 223
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Bounded Queue 27 29 31 32 36 44 64
fmtlog 29 31 34 36 41 50 83
PlatformLab NanoLog 71 86 105 117 136 158 247
MS BinLog 50 51 53 56 77 127 234
Reckless 215 242 268 284 314 517 830
Iyengar NanoLog 172 191 218 238 312 401 55110
spdlog 653 708 770 831 950 1083 1272
g3log 4802 4998 5182 5299 5535 5825 6525

4 Threads

Library 50th 75th 90th 95th 99th 99.9th Worst
Quill v2.3.2, Unbounded Queue 29 30 32 33 36 42 64
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Unbounded Queue 27 29 31 32 37 47 75
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Disabled, Unbounded Queue 127 141 157 168 185 203 227
Quill v1.7, Dual Queue Enabled, Bounded Queue 27 29 31 32 39 51 100
fmtlog 28 30 33 35 41 51 82
PlatformLab NanoLog 69 82 99 111 134 194 321
MS BinLog 50 52 54 58 86 130 246
Reckless 187 209 232 247 291 562 818
Iyengar NanoLog 159 173 242 282 351 472 66730
spdlog 679 751 839 906 1132 1478 2190
g3log 4739 4955 5157 5284 5545 5898 6823

The benchmarks are done on Ubuntu - Intel(R) Xeon(R) Gold 6254 CPU @ 3.10GHz with GCC 11.2

Each thread is pinned on a different cpu. Unfortunately the cores are not isolated on this system. If the backend logging thread is run in the same CPU as the caller hot-path threads, that slows down the log message processing on the backend logging thread and will cause the SPSC queue to fill faster and re-allocate.

Continuously logging messages in a loop makes the consumer (backend logging thread) unable to follow up and the queue will have to re-allocate or block for most logging libraries expect very high throughput binary loggers like PlatformLab Nanolog.

Therefore, a different approach was followed that suits more to a real time application:

  1. 20 messages are logged in a loop.
  2. calculate/store the average latency for those messages.
  3. wait between 1-2 ms.
  4. repeat for n iterations.

I run each logger benchmark 4 times and the above latencies are the second best result.

The benchmark code and results can be found here.

Supported Platforms And Compilers

Quill v1.7.x requires a C++14 compiler. Minimum required versions of supported compilers are shown in the below table.

Compiler Notes
GCC version >= 5.0
Clang version >= 5.0
MSVC++ version >= 14.3
Platform Notes
Linux Ubuntu, RHEL, Centos, Fedora
Windows Windows 10 - version 1607, Windows Server 2016
macOS Tested with Xcode 9.4

Basic usage

#include "quill/Quill.h"

int main()
{
  quill::enable_console_colours();
  quill::start();

  quill::Logger* logger = quill::get_logger();
  logger->set_log_level(quill::LogLevel::TraceL3);

  // enable a backtrace that will get flushed when we log CRITICAL
  logger->init_backtrace(2, quill::LogLevel::Critical);

  LOG_BACKTRACE(logger, "Backtrace log {}", 1);
  LOG_BACKTRACE(logger, "Backtrace log {}", 2);

  LOG_INFO(logger, "Welcome to Quill!");
  LOG_ERROR(logger, "An error message. error code {}", 123);
  LOG_WARNING(logger, "A warning message.");
  LOG_CRITICAL(logger, "A critical error.");
  LOG_DEBUG(logger, "Debugging foo {}", 1234);
  LOG_TRACE_L1(logger, "{:>30}", "right aligned");
  LOG_TRACE_L2(logger, "Positional arguments are {1} {0} ", "too", "supported");
  LOG_TRACE_L3(logger, "Support for floats {:03.2f}", 1.23456);
}

Output

Screenshot-2020-08-14-at-01-09-43.png

CMake-Integration

External

Building and Installing Quill as Static Library
git clone https://github.com/odygrd/quill.git
mkdir cmake_build
cd cmake_build
make install

Note: To install in custom directory invoke cmake with -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/quill/install-dir/

Building and Installing Quill as Static Library With External libfmt
cmake -DCMAKE_PREFIX_PATH=/my/fmt/fmt-config.cmake-directory/ -DQUILL_FMT_EXTERNAL=ON -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/quill/install-dir/'

Then use the library from a CMake project, you can locate it directly with find_package()

Directory Structure
my_project/
├── CMakeLists.txt
├── main.cpp
CMakeLists.txt
# Set only if needed - quill was installed under a custom non-standard directory
set(CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH /test_quill/usr/local/)

find_package(quill REQUIRED)

# Linking your project against quill
add_executable(example main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(example PRIVATE quill::quill)
main.cpp

See basic usage

Embedded

To embed the library directly, copy the source folder to your project and call add_subdirectory() in your CMakeLists.txt file

Directory Structure
my_project/
├── quill/            (source folder)
├── CMakeLists.txt
├── main.cpp
CMakeLists.txt
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1.0)
project(my_project)

set(CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD 14)

add_subdirectory(quill)

add_executable(my_project main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(my_project PRIVATE quill::quill)
main.cpp

See basic usage

Documentation

Advanced usage and additional documentation can be found in the wiki pages.

The examples folder is also a good source of documentation.

License

Quill is licensed under the MIT License

Quill depends on third party libraries with separate copyright notices and license terms. Your use of the source code for these subcomponents is subject to the terms and conditions of the following licenses.


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the quill README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.